lesbianaunt:

millika:

Who’s Alex?
Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

kick ass

lesbianaunt:

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

kick ass

(via missowleyes)

"Just because your pain is understandable, doesn’t mean your behavior is acceptable."

Steve Maraboli, Unapologetically You: Reflections on Life and the Human Experience (via derikisu)

Keep this one in your back pocket for the next time someone acts like an ass and then tells you they’ve been through a lot of stuff. Respectful and yet still firmly keeping respect for yourself. 

(via emilyvgordon)

(Source: quotes-shape-us, via missowleyes)

belladonnaswitchblog:

cocojigglypuff:

hoboway:

The Psychology of Colour -

A Guide for Designers.

Haha pink!!

~This is pretty much how color magick works. 

(Source: lifemadesimple, via novas-grimoire)

mydollyaviana:

disneyismyescape:

carry-on-until-its-gone:

wish-upon-the-disney-star:

This scene is SO important. Maleficent is with someone she trusts, someone she considers a friend. And then the next thing she knows, she wakes up in pain, bleeding, with her wings burned off. A huge part of her has been destroyed.

Rape is so prominent in our culture that it is in a Disney movie. Maybe not explicitly, but it is very clear what this scene represents and it is so sad.

I fucking cried my eyes out during this scene

AJ even confirmed that this is what this scene was a metaphor for (x) - just because i saw someone say today that this is not what this scene is about

'We were very conscious that it was a metaphor for rape': The actress explained how the scene in which her character has her wings ripped off her body while in a drug-induced sleep had to be something 'so violent and aggressive' that it would make her 'lose all sense of her maternity, her womanhood and her softness' 

when a man violates a woman, he cuts off her wings.

(Source: bbuchanann, via missowleyes)

dajo42:

"it’s just a phase"
i mean the moon has phases but it’s still literally always the moon. just because the moon’s doing something different today doesn’t mean it was lying about being the moon yesterday

(via lenenessness)

verbose-vespertine:

cubebreaker:

Designer Goula Figeura’s Orwell day bed lets you easily shut yourself off from the outside world with its light and noise-cancelling curtains.

I have a MIGHTY NEED.

"LIGHT- AND NOISE-CANCELLING CURTAINS"?? GIMMEEEEEE~

(via yukiibutt)

art-of-swords:

The Weighty Issue of Two-Handed Greatswords
By John Clements
Popular media, fantasy games, and uninformed historians frequently give the impression that these immense weapons were awkward, unwieldy and ponderously heavy. The facts confirm an entirely different understanding. To understand what we are discussing it is important to first have a working definition. The respected work, Swords and Hilt Weapons, offers this description of the weapon:
"The two-handed sword was a specialized and effective infantry weapon, and was recognized as such in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Although large, measuring 60-70 in/150-175 cm overall, it was not as hefty as it looked, weighing something of the order of 5-8 lbs/2.3-3.6 kg. In the hands of the Swiss and German infantrymen it was lethal, and its use was considered as special skill, often meriting extra pay. Fifteenth-century examples usually have an expanded cruciform hilt, sometimes with side rings on one or both sides of the quillon block.
This was the form which remained dominant in Italy during the sixteenth century, but in Germany a more flamboyant form developed. Two-handed swords typically have a generous ricasso to allow the blade to be safely gripped below the quillons and thus wielded more effectively at close quarters. Triangular or pointed projections, known as flukes, were added at the base of the ricasso to defend the hand.” (Coe et al, p. 48)
In contrast to longswords, technically, true two-handed swords (epee’s a deux main) or “two-handers” were actually Renaissance, not Medieval weapons. They are really those specialized forms of the later 1500-1600s, such as the Swiss/German Dopplehänder (“double-hander”) or Bidenhänder (“both-hander”).
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The ARMA 

art-of-swords:

The Weighty Issue of Two-Handed Greatswords

  • By John Clements

Popular media, fantasy games, and uninformed historians frequently give the impression that these immense weapons were awkward, unwieldy and ponderously heavy. The facts confirm an entirely different understanding. To understand what we are discussing it is important to first have a working definition. The respected work, Swords and Hilt Weapons, offers this description of the weapon:

"The two-handed sword was a specialized and effective infantry weapon, and was recognized as such in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Although large, measuring 60-70 in/150-175 cm overall, it was not as hefty as it looked, weighing something of the order of 5-8 lbs/2.3-3.6 kg. In the hands of the Swiss and German infantrymen it was lethal, and its use was considered as special skill, often meriting extra pay. Fifteenth-century examples usually have an expanded cruciform hilt, sometimes with side rings on one or both sides of the quillon block.

This was the form which remained dominant in Italy during the sixteenth century, but in Germany a more flamboyant form developed. Two-handed swords typically have a generous ricasso to allow the blade to be safely gripped below the quillons and thus wielded more effectively at close quarters. Triangular or pointed projections, known as flukes, were added at the base of the ricasso to defend the hand.” (Coe et al, p. 48)

In contrast to longswords, technically, true two-handed swords (epee’s a deux main) or “two-handers” were actually Renaissance, not Medieval weapons. They are really those specialized forms of the later 1500-1600s, such as the Swiss/German Dopplehänder (“double-hander”) or Bidenhänder (“both-hander”).

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The ARMA 

kammartinez:

Author John Scalzi was on a roll this morning (currently 7:14 AM, 26 Sept. 2014) with a tweet he found from some guy sending out an “ultimatum” to women to “make a choice” between feminism and, well, men like him. So Scalzi launched into a truly magnificent set of scorchers, which I’m posting here for the delectation of people everywhere.

Also: I would like to thank that guy for setting the ultimatum. It makes finding a boyfriend so much easier when the undesirable ones wear a placard identifying themselves.

(via missowleyes)

yayasmeen:

I think my selfie problem is getting out of hand..

(via lenenessness)